A Deep Dive into the Progressive Safe System (PSS)

Dive deeper into the intricacies of the Direct Vision Standard (DVS) and its significant role in enhancing road safety through our enlightening video. This feature offers an all-encompassing view of how our cutting-edge safety solutions aid in adhering to these fresh regulations, guaranteeing that your fleet is up to par with the required safety norms.

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    A Deep Dive into the Progressive Safe System (PSS)

    The Progressive Safe System (PSS) is a cutting-edge safety solution developed to enhance the current Direct Vision Standard (DVS) Safe System. From 28th October 2024, all Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) over 12 tonnes operating within Greater London will be required to install the PSS to comply with legal regulations.

    The Progressive Safe System (PSS) shares the core objective of the existing DVS Safe System but incorporates advanced technologies for superior safety. It provides drivers with improved indirect vision and effectively eliminates blind spots on the nearside of the vehicle. The system’s key components, including the Blind Spot Information System (BSIS) and the Moving Off Information System (MOIS), offer sophisticated detection capabilities, distinguishing between stationary and moving objects and alerting the driver only when necessary.

    Progressive Safe System -PSS truck
    Statistics & Impacts

    Active Side Sensor Systems that can

    Differentiate between moving and stationary objects

    Predict collisions “based on the trajectories of the vehicle and the vulnerable road user (VRU) to calculate if a collision is imminent.

    Provide a specified alarm strategy to warn of the severity of the situation.

    Why it is important to install Progressive Safe System (PSS)

    Our PSS solutions go beyond just meeting regulatory requirements. They offer a multitude of additional benefits that enhance your fleet operations:

    Enhanced Safety

    The PSS significantly reduces the risk of accidents by providing comprehensive coverage of blind spots and alerting drivers to potential hazards, particularly on the nearside and front of the vehicle. This ensures the safety of vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists.

    Legal Compliance

    From 28th October 2024, it will be mandatory for HGVs over 12 tonnes to have the PSS installed to operate legally within Greater London. Compliance with these regulations is crucial for avoiding fines and operational disruptions.

    Advanced Technology

    The PSS integrates state-of-the-art technologies, such as the BSIS and MOIS, which offer enhanced detection and alerting systems. These advancements provide drivers with critical information, improving their ability to make informed decisions and respond promptly to potential dangers.

    Operational Efficiency

    By reducing the likelihood of accidents and enhancing driver awareness, the PSS contributes to smoother and more efficient fleet operations. This leads to decreased downtime, lower insurance premiums, and improved overall fleet performance.

    Understanding UNECE Regulation 151 and 159 vs. DVS Requirements

    It’s important to clarify the distinctions between UNECE Regulation 151 and 159 and the DVS requirements. These regulations have different detection areas. For instance, in terms of side detection, Regulation 151 allows for a specific gap, whereas DVS mandates detection right up to the side of the vehicle. The same applies to front detection, where Regulation 159 allows a gap, but DVS requires detection right up to the nose of the vehicle. The General Safety Regulations (GSR) reference whole vehicle homologation rather than individual components. Therefore, a product meeting Regulations 151 and 159 may not necessarily meet DVS requirements at the aftermarket stage.

    • DVS Equipment Certification and Compliance
      The PSS outlines specific test procedures, placing the responsibility on DVS equipment manufacturers to confirm that their products meet the requirements through a ‘sensor functionality statement.’ Manufacturers must also provide details on how their products integrate with other systems without compromising safety-critical aspects or vehicle performance. Products with an E-mark certification will meet these requirements.
    • Evidence needed to comply with the PSS
      Operators will need to upload documentation with photographic evidence of compliance. This documentation will be crucial for monitoring and enforcement. Any non-compliance issues identified later can be readily traced back to the manufacturer used. It is essential for fitters to confirm that the sensors fitted to the vehicle are active and installed in compliance with the technical PSS specification. This approach will promote both product and installation quality.
    Progressive Safe System

    Sensor Functionality Statement

    The PSS sets out specific test procedures and it is the responsibility of the DVS equipment manufacturer to confirm that products meet the requirements via a ‘sensor functionality statement.’ This should include details of how the products link with other systems and confirmation that they do not adversely affect any safety critical aspects or performance of the vehicle. If a product has an E-mark it will meet these requirements.

    The document will need to be uploaded by the operator. If there are any non-compliance issues identified at a later date, it will be easily identified from the manufacturer used. Fitters will also need to confirm that the sensors fitted to the vehicle are active and fitted in compliance with the technical PSS specification.

    FAQ's

    The DVS Progressive Safe System (PSS) is an advanced version of the current Direct Vision Standard (DVS) Safe System. It is designed for fleet operators to install on Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) over 12 tonnes, enabling them to operate legally within Greater London starting from 28th October 2024.

    The PSS offers increased intelligence and sophistication compared to the current system. Its main enhancements include a nearside detection system (Blind Spot Information System – BSIS) and a front sensor detection system (Moving Off Information System – MOIS). These systems can distinguish between stationary and moving objects, alerting drivers only when moving objects are detected. Additionally, a nearside camera monitoring system is required to eliminate blind spots on the nearside of the vehicle and trailer.

    The PSS includes the following components:

    • Left Turn Alarm (NC-LTA): Alerts pedestrians and cyclists when the vehicle is turning left.
    • 5 Metre Aviation Cable (NC-5M): Connects various components of the system.
    • BSIS & MOIS Radar System: Detects and distinguishes between stationary and moving objects.
    • Rugged 180 Degree Side Camera (NC906-180): Provides comprehensive nearside visibility.
    • Low Speed Pulse & Indicator Trigger (NC-SP-TM): Activates alerts based on vehicle speed and indicator usage.
    • 7 Inch Monitor (NC-MON-7): Displays camera feeds and alerts to the driver, featuring 2 AV inputs, 1 trigger, a speaker, and HDB.

    The BSIS aims to eliminate blind spots on the nearside of the vehicle by detecting and distinguishing between stationary and moving objects. It alerts the driver only when moving objects are detected, enhancing safety for pedestrians and cyclists.

    The MOIS is a front sensor detection system that functions similarly to the BSIS. It distinguishes between stationary and moving objects in front of the vehicle, alerting the driver only when moving objects are detected. This system is crucial for preventing accidents when the vehicle starts moving.

    Starting from 28th October 2024, HGVs over 12 tonnes must be equipped with the PSS to comply with legal requirements for operating within Greater London. The PSS enhances safety by providing indirect vision and eliminating blind spots, protecting vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists.